goddess that became a disease

Jungian analyst and NYAAP President Gary Trosclair weaves together Jung’s ideas, contemporary trends, and both ancient and modern mythology to offer a perspective on our need to control. His essay was originally posted at www.thehealthycompulsive.com. ___________________________________________________________   Carl Jung famously wrote that the gods have become diseases. What he meant was that because we no longer consciously

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Drawing by Beth Thielen, from the book “Country Gone Missing: Nightmares in the Time of Trump”, 2018. Crowd sourced nightmares illustrated by Beth Thielen and edited by Louise Steinman. For information go to: countrygonemissing.com Proceeds to benefit Swing Left. This drawing is an illustration of the following dream: "We are getting rid of Trump bit by bit by killing him with kindness. I am kneeling in front of him, beseeching him, saying, “It’s ok. Relax. Just calmly put down the country and we’ll take care of it all.” Like he was pointing a gun at me. My kindness is like taking slivers of him bit by bit and placing them in folded sheets of waxed paper. Then the process allows me to take longer square blocks of him by chanting Om.”

In this post Alexandra Krithades, NYAAP member and President of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York, describes the role that she feels psychoanalysis needs to play in helping clients deal with the impact of dramatic social change, and the role that psychoanalysts themselves must play in this era. Her essay was originally posted at TherapyRoute.com. 

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role of community in individuation
Ambrogio Lorenzetti, detail from “Allegory of Good Government"

Gary Trosclair, DMA, LCSW, President, NYAAP

Last month I was elected president of The New York Association for Analytical Psychology (NYAAP), our community of Jungian analysts in the New York metropolitan area. This new position has led me to reflect on our vision for NYAAP, and, closely related, the role of community in individuation.

NYAAP evolved from a group of analysts who had trained and analyzed with Jung in Zurich and then came together in New York in the 1930s to share their experience and develop their ideas about psychological transformation. They felt that by coming together they could better share what they had learned with the larger community. But more importantly they could amplify their own engagement with Psyche. They formed a learning community, but it wasn’t just academic.

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