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What is Jungian Analysis?

Jungian analysis is a form of depth psychotherapy pioneered by Swiss psychiatrist Carl Jung in the early 20th century. Many are attracted to Jung’s approach because of his emphasis on deep psychological growth rather than just symptom relief, and because of his respect for spirituality and the creative process. Jung himself referred to the approach he initiated as Analytical Psychology and believed that it should continue to develop beyond his own discoveries and insights. And it has. Current Jungian practice is enriched by a broad range of perspectives and research.

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The New York Association for Analytical Psychology (NYAAP) is a professional society of graduate Jungian analysts practicing primarily in the greater New York metropolitan area and throughout the United States and Canada. NYAAP provides professional enrichment for members, conducts regularly scheduled business meetings, and maintains a free personalized Referral Service for the public.

NYAAP is a charter member of The International Association for Analytical Psychology and plays a leading role in both the local and international Jungian communities.

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goddess that became a disease

Jungian analyst and NYAAP President Gary Trosclair weaves together Jung’s ideas, contemporary trends, and both ancient and modern mythology to offer a perspective on our need to control. His essay was originally posted at www.thehealthycompulsive.com. ___________________________________________________________   Carl Jung famously wrote that the gods have become diseases. What he meant was that because we no longer consciously

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role of community in individuation

Gary Trosclair, DMA, LCSW, President, NYAAP

Last month I was elected president of The New York Association for Analytical Psychology (NYAAP), our community of Jungian analysts in the New York metropolitan area. This new position has led me to reflect on our vision for NYAAP, and, closely related, the role of community in individuation.

NYAAP evolved from a group of analysts who had trained and analyzed with Jung in Zurich and then came together in New York in the 1930s to share their experience and develop their ideas about psychological transformation. They felt that by coming together they could better share what they had learned with the larger community. But more importantly they could amplify their own engagement with Psyche. They formed a learning community, but it wasn’t just academic.

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